Aloe Vera

Name: Aloe Vera
Biological Name(s):

Aloe barbadensis
Aloe Indica
Aloe Barbados
Aloe Vera

Lily family, Liliaceae

Other Names: Aloe, Aloe Vera, Indian Alces, Kumari, Ghirita, Gawarpaltra, Barbados aloe, Curacao aloe, Lu hui
Description:

Aloe is a perennial succulent native to East and South Africa. It is cultivated in the West Indies and other tropical countries. The tissue in the center of the aloe leaf contains a gel which yields aloe gel or aloe vera gel. Aloe is believed to have been used to preserve body of Jesus Christ.

Parts Used: Leaf gel and sap. Aloin Extract, dried juice of leaves and pulp root
Active Compounds: Aloin, obtained from the gel in the leaf. Responsible for the plant's healing properties.
Remedies For:

Alterative, bitter tonic, rejuvenative, emmenagogue, purgative, emollient, vulnerary.

When applied externally, aloe vera restores skin tissues and may aid the healing of burns and sores. It can also be used on blemishes and dandruff. Used cosmetically, Aloe vera softens the skin.

Aloe vera is also taken internally for stomach disorders. Dried aloe latex, a substance derived from the leaf, is a strong laxative. Modern doctors have used aloe for x-ray burns, sunburn, chemical burns, first degree burns, traumatized tissue, decibitus ulcers or bedsores, skin inflammation, stomach ulcers, herpes simplex, peridontal surgery, insect bites and stings, irritating plant stings, and other minor skin manifestations.

Aloe had shown outstanding results in treating facial edema (swelling). When used as a mouth rinse, it was effective for cold spores and lockjaw.

Applications

amenorrhea

asthma

inflamed or diseased breasts

burns

bursitis

colds

colic

conjunctivitis

constipation

coughs

dys- menorrhea

dysentery with bloody stools

ear infections

eye problems

fat and sugar metabolism

fever

gonorrhea

heart pain

hemorrhoids

hepatitis

herpes

infant pneumonia

insomnia

Intestinal worms

jaundice

kidney disorders

enlarged liver

menopause

rheumatism

skin inflammations

skin rashes

sores

sore throat

spleen, enlarged

toothache

TB and other lung diseases

tumors

ulcers, chronic

vaginitis

venereal diseases

Dosage: Aloe vera comes in a number of forms: natural gel, prepared ointment, salve or lotion, liquid drink concentrate and encapsulated powder.

Can be used externally or taken internally depending on conditions.

For minor cuts and inflammation, apply the gel from the leaf directly on the wound. For larger inflammations etc. use a concentrated ointment, salve or lotion. For internal use, aloe comes as a drink concentrate. Dilute it to 1 oz = 1 quart prior to consuming.

Safety:

In the USA, the leaf gel is generally recognized as safe as a food.

Canada - approved as an over-the counter laxative

France: Traditional medicine

Germany: Commission E approved as an over-the-counter drug

Japan: Japanese pharmacopoeia

U.K. British pharmacopoeia.

Do not use if you are pregnant, menstruating, or by those with cold, weak spleen and stomach.